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Webtoons I Think Are Worth Sharing

Sunday, October 17, 2021 / No Comments

Webtoons I Think Are Worth Sharing 

What I'm about to introduce are works that I think are absolute gems and that more people should know of. So without further ado, let's get started. 


  1. Odd Girl Out


I’m sure at some point in your life, you’ve compared your looks to someone else’s. Be it girl or guy, it’s basic human nature. So here’s a cute little Webtoon about a girl-next-door character being roped into a clique of three drop-dead gorgeous girls. 




In her new school, Nari was looking forward to peaceful, fruitful school days after her personal glow up, when she found herself surrounded by three beauties —  Seonji, Mirae and Yuna.




Seonji looks like an angel and is an angel. She comes from a humble background and although a little naive, she is the sweetest soft girl you’ll ever meet and treats everyone she knows with sincerity. 


Mirae is the kind of girl everyone wishes they were friends with. With her bigger-than-life personality, she can lift up the mood with a step into the room. That paired with her chic looks make her a shining star in everyone’s eyes, quite literally (You’ll understand what I mean when you read the Webtoon).


Yuna, is well, to put it simply, gorgeous. She makes head turns, but no one dares to go near her because of her cold exterior. However, deep inside, is just a delicate girl looking for something genuine in her life.

 




And with that, it’s finally time to introduce our main character ─ sweet ol’ Nari. She’s wholesome, down-to-earth, and has a heart of gold. Warm and caring, Nari is the righteous friend you know you can rely on for help. 


This story takes you on Nari’s school life journey, where she has to navigate through the muddy waters of drama, relationships and more. From being the target of malicious gossip to testing new relationship waters, every episode displays the most simple but tasteful stories. So if you’re looking for something to relive your school days, here you go.




  1. New Normal: Class 8 


A school full of unusual people ─ that’s Class 8 for you. Filled with the most peculiar characters, you’ll be surprised at how much depth is under this odd group. 




Let’s take a look at our main character: Big Head. I-I’m serious, he actually lives up to his nickname. Big Head has, well, a big head. In fact, when he first tried to enter the classroom, he got stuck at the doorway because of his head. 


If you think that’s strange, wait till you hear the rest of the characters. Some of them include a feisty girl the size of your thumb, a guy with arms for noodles, and a teacher with a halo over his head. 




As you may have guessed, the genre of this Webtoon is comedy. However, as it progresses, you’ll also get splashed with some romance, some drama, and everything in between. Two friends crushing on the same girl, being discriminated against by others for your appearance, dealing with family abuse ─ this Webtoon displays a wide range of situations that occur in real life. 


And with that, I hope you will give these two works a try. Who knows, maybe you’ll be the one sharing them with others in the future :  ) 



Written by Potato.



Japanese Crane Games Online: Dokodemo Catcher/DC7

Wednesday, September 22, 2021 / No Comments


If you're like me, you'll love arcades. And more than just arcades, you'll also love Japanese arcades; the kinds with intricate machine set-ups and various Anime goodies waiting for you on the other side of that glass cabinet. Sadly, due to the pandemic, it's not safe to travel to Japan right now.

However!

There's a way to experience the joy of crane machines without needing to board a plane, and we have technology to thank for that.

Not sponsored, though I wish it was.

Introducing: Dokodemo Catcher/DC7
This crane game app goes by two names, but I'll be referring to it as DC7.

As mentioned earlier, DC7 is a Japanese crane game app that you can play from the comfort of your home! There are a variety of prizes to be won, from the latest Anime figures to cute household items like containers and trash bins. You can play on various machines too, from the typical three claw set-up to takoyaki machines, just like a real Japanese arcade.

They have a pretty cute mascot, too.

I'm obsessed with Japanese crane games in general so, of course, I had to give the app a try! Here are some observations I've made for crane fanatics who want to give it a go!

        1. Large Variety of Prizes
They have special events sometimes, too.

There are lots of prizes to be won! Ranging from Sanrio plushies to Jujutsu Kaisen figures, there's bound to be something for everyone. The selection of prizes is updated daily, so you will always have access to the latest Anime goods from Japan!

The search function on the app is pretty advanced, as you can search for machines based on the type of machine (three pronged claw/'bridge' set-up/'takoyaki' set-up), the type of prize (plushie/figure/), and so on!

A thing to note: Some prizes can't be shipped out of Japan, which means that you can't play on just any machine you see. There will be a logo on the machine's thumbnail indicating if it's a Japan-only prize, so do look out for that!

In order to play the machines, you need to purchase DP. Different machines need differing amounts of DP per play, which brings in my next point...

        2. Affordable Prices
Price per play differs from each machine, with the lowest being 90 DP while the highest can go up to 350 DP. The most common price, it seems, is 180-200 DP, which is roughly 2SGD per play! Considering that most prizes are the latest Anime items straight from Japan, this is a pretty good price!

One thing to note is that once per month, you can buy DP at a discounted price. If you're the type of person to funnel money into crane machines (like me), it's going to be very helpful!

Now that you've played some machines and won a few prizes, the only thing left to do is receive your prizes, which brings me to my last point...

        3. Solid Delivery
It's so big! Featuring Nendoroid 1469, Bedivere.

I did say that I gave the app a try!

Although it took a month for the prizes to arrive, the prizes came bubble wrapped and perfectly intact, with not even a dent on the boxes! I've experienced prizes from other crane game apps getting dented in the mail in the past, so this was a pleasant surprise.

One thing to take note is that, if you're shipping outside of Japan, you need to pay for shipping using DP (which is exactly what I did). Make sure to purchase extra DP for that!

Now, let's look at the spoils...

All wrapped safely in plastic and bubble wrap; no dents!

The prizes that I won were:
1. Fate/Grand Order Servant Figure Moon Cancer/BB
2. Pompompurin Storage Container
3. Super Sonico BiCute Bunnies Figure
4. Pompompurin Lunch Box
5. Fate/Grand Order Camelot the Movie Mouse w/ Mouse Pad
6. Pompompurin Easter Bunny Plush

As you can see, I'm a big fan of Pompompurin and Fate/Grand Order! There are plenty of prizes from those two categories, which made me really happy. 

I'd definitely recommend DC7 to anyone who loves crane machines since they have a wide selection of prizes, monthly discounts and good delivery.

I'll do a review on the figures in another post, so please look forward to that.

Until then, stay home, stay safe, and have fun!


Written by Ririko

Here’s Some Chill Romance Anime for You

Tuesday, September 21, 2021 / No Comments

Hmm, romance anime. There are hundreds and hundreds of those out there, some with little twists and turns that bring out quite bizarre premises. But what about some good old, “ah, that hits the spot” shows? Here are some cute, light-hearted watches if you’re just looking to chill and enjoy. 


  1. Wotaku: Love Is Hard for Otaku 


A romance anime revolving around an adult couple in a workplace environment. And guess what? They’re both otakus! 






Despite being a show with grown-up characters in an office setting, its playful demeanour makes this anime a good watch. The concerns these characters face regarding otaku culture, romance and work-life are relatable to me, despite the fact that I’m a student. 


Our female protagonist, Narumi, is a preppy and cute lady who tries to hide her “true identity” of being an otaku in her new workplace. However, to her surprise, her childhood friend is also there 一 Nifuji, a stoic and down-to-earth gamer. As they bond over their connections with the otaku culture, they also find themselves in a relationship with each other. 







Most romance anime I’ve witnessed are full of melodramas and misunderstandings. This is not one of them. The main couple, Narumi and Nifiji, have striking chemistry with each other and demonstrate the essence of a healthy relationship. The side couple, Hanahko and Tarou, make for an adorable sight as a cosplayer girlfriend and a straight cis man. 


With a pretty small group of characters, you’ll quickly adapt to each of their traits and quirks and grow attached to them. 



  1. Monthly Girls’ Nozaki-Kun


The behind-the-scenes of a manga 一 all that’s reflected in this show. Monthly Girls’ Nozaki-Kun is about a cheerful student named Sakura, who has a massive crush on her schoolmate Nozaki. And guess what? He turns out to be the creator behind a famous shoujo manga. 




When Sakura musters up all her courage to finally confess to the stoic Nozaki, he mistakes her as one of his fans. And somehow, along the way, Sakura ends up as his manga assistant. 


The anime delves into the characters’ school life and the manga scene. Each character has their own unique quirky character 一 like Nozaki and his obliviousness that’s often mistaken for stoicism, and his friend Mikoshiba, whom Nozaki takes as a character inspiration due to his frivolous and yet shy, tsundere-like personality. 






Naomi constantly tries her very best to get closer to Nozaki. She floods her mind with romantic daydreams and is hit with the reality of her crush’s impassiveness, making for a bunch of comedic moments. Her interactions with the other characters also make for an entertaining watch due to the bickers and laughs they have with each other. 


With all that said, if you’re looking for some angsty slow-burn, this is not the show for that. But running gags and little specks of that first love you feel blooming for your first crush? This anime has just that. 



  1. Kimi ni Todoke


Are you a fan of the loner girl and popular boy trope? Well, fret no more, I’ve just the thing for you. Introducing Kimi ni Todoke: the story of a girl who’s avoided by others because of her scary appearance, and her undying crush on the extroverted, golden-retriever popular boy who’s loved by everyone.






In this show, you won’t find yourself trying to resist the urge to throw eggs at the guy for being an absolute jerk, or the girl for “not being like other girls”. Instead, you’ll get characters who are sweet and genuinely care for each other 一 the epitome of a healthy relationship, which is unfortunately not a common find in recent romance anime. 


This is a perfect watch for those who want to relieve some raw, pure romance with genuine relationship development. At the start, our female protagonist, Sawako, was greatly feared by other students due to her seemingly ghastly demeanour. But underneath all that lies a naive, gentle girl with a kind soul, someone who you can’t help but grow to adore. As people get the chance to interact with Sawako, they get to know her real character and open up to her. 






And Kazehaya is, well, your typical sunshine boy. Nothing about him is over-exaggerated, and it makes sense that he’s a character many girls would have a crush on. That’s the essence of this show 一 the people are realistic and can be found in your everyday life. 


So what are you waiting for? Get comfy and ready to delve into the world of some heartwarming, cosy scenes that you wish would happen to you. Have fun : )




Written by Potato.

Anime That Will Change the Way You Look at Life

Wednesday, September 8, 2021 / No Comments

 I think the title already spoils what this article is about, so let's hop right into it! 



  1. ReLIFE


Have you ever felt like you’re stuck in life and don’t know what to do? Same. Oh, not for me, luckily 一 but for the main character in ReLIFE.


Kaizaki Arata is a 27-year-old man who doesn’t know where he’s heading in life. He was working at a convenience store when a mysterious man approaches him and gives him the opportunity to relive his teenage years. 




So what does he do? He takes it, duh. 


There he meets the aloof and socially awkward Hishiro Chizuru, the naive but good-hearted Ooga Kazuomi, and hardworking and strong-hearted Kariu Rena. Under the guidance of the mystery man, also known as his support who goes by the name Yoake Ryou, Kaizaki navigates through his youthful days once again. That sounds breezy, right?


Wrong.


Being young again isn’t as easy as you’d think. Kaizaki is behind the times with grades, slang and trends. But he isn’t one to give up. So step by step, he immerses himself into this strange world that he had a taste of in the past. And like I said, it’s tiny steps, so expect this show to be a slow burn. 




As you watch episode by episode, you’ll get to see character developments and insightful lessons being learnt. From trying to make friends to feeling incompetent as compared to your classmates, this show portrays struggles that students face all the time. 


There are also some love arcs sprinkled here and there! Nothing illegal, don’t worry. You’ll get what I mean when you’re near the end of the anime. 


So for those looking for a simple but thoughtful show, here you go. And who knows? You might just start reliving your own life after watching. 



  1. Oregairu


School life anime - there's tons and tons of them. But for one to stand out among the rest and leave an impression? That’s the real deal.


For me, one such anime is, take a deep breath ㅡ Yahari Ore no Seishun Love Comedy wa Machigatteriru, also known as My Teen Romantic Comedy SNAFU (actually in short, just call it Oregairu). Adapted from a light novel series by Wataru Watari, this anime has since branched out into more than one animation, and hopefully more to come.




So you may be thinking: what makes this anime different and unique from the rest? Well, what makes it so refreshing to me is undoubtedly the writing and character developments throughout the show, and how authentic it feels. Oregairu follows the main protagonist, an apathetic and antisocial guy named Hachiman and his interactions in his school days. Sounds simple, right? But it’s so much more than that. 


Have you ever experienced times when you felt left out, not just by people you aren’t familiar with, but even with your close friends? Have you ever felt like you needed to act like someone you’re not in order to fit in? I believe all of us, at some point in our lives, would have said yes to the questions above. And that’s what Oregairu is about. It addresses the unspoken issues we all face in our society today. Things like knowing you’re a people pleaser and hating it; wanting to isolate yourself because you’re afraid of getting hurt ㅡ  you get perspectives of people from all walks of life, with different personalities and different mindsets. 




Hachiman is someone who doesn’t want to keep up a facade to socialize with people because to him, that’s hypocrisy. So he keeps to himself and judges the interactions between people to justify his own behaviour. Though deep down, he secretly wishes someone would reach out to him to listen and understand. With his crude sense of humour and the way he sees things, this anime is undoubtedly an interesting take from the rest. Under all the pretty faces and comedic moments, this show touches on the most sensitive and deep troubles people face on a daily basis. 


Oregairu is not your typical romance, school life anime. It is philosophical and delves deep into one’s heart and tugs at its heartstrings. You will feel for each character as though they are you and you are them. And that’s what makes it so real. 



  1. Rascal Does Not Dream of Bunny Girl Senpai


Interesting title, right? Well, the show’s even more interesting. 


It starts off with a guy spotting a girl in a bunny costume at the library… and other people not noticing. Turns out, girls in this anime are going through this phrase called the “Puberty Syndrome”, where they inhabit some strange ability related to an issue they’re going through. 




Viewers follow the protagonist male, Sakuta, through his journey handling victims of Puberty Syndrome. With an essence of the supernatural, brace yourself for some strange scenarios including the same day repeating, a victim’s twin sprouting out of nowhere, scars that appear from hate comments, and many more. And with each story, you learn to care and empathize with a new character. 


The character interactions in this show are what sold it for me. Every character has their own quirk and individuality, and the connections formed between them feel natural and genuine. Sakuta himself is a bold-faced and kind-hearted guy with his own weird (and pretty twisted) sense of humour. There’s also our main heroine, Mai, who rose to fame from a young age and has a sensitive and pure soul. Comparing someone who runs his mouth however he likes it and someone who keeps things serious and professional, the interactions between Sakuta and Mai are both entertaining and endearing. 


A slice-of-life that holds the most meaningful messages, this is not a show to be missed.



Written by Potato.
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Orchestral Manoeuvres at the ArtScience Museum

Monday, September 6, 2021 / No Comments


Besides the grandeur of its architecture, the ArtScience Museum is a place where seasonal exhibitions are put up for periods of time. From 28th August to 2nd January, Marina Bay Sands is hosting an exhibition called, “Orchestral Manoeuvres: See Sound. Feel Sound. Be Sound.” The exhibit, bringing together 32 composers and contemporary artists from across the world is an engaging blend between arts and sound. Last Friday, fellow writers Yin, Gin and I (kimizomi) had the privilege to be invited to a media preview of the exhibition and we’re happy to review some of the best bits with you! If you’re wondering too how anime might come into place within this exhibition, you’ll be surprised at some of the things that we might pick out! 

Orchestral Manoeuvres is held on a level with a circular structure. It would take us through the different exhibits around the area in one circle around the place. This reminds me of how sound is surround, like in a theatre. The location is definitely nicely chosen.  


Robert Morris’ Box with the Sound of Its Own Making, 1961.

You wouldn’t think that such simple boxes like these had the power to contain sounds in it, would you? Well, there’s more to this than meets the eye! One of the concrete stones dates back to 1977, when a German composer Timm Ulrich uses the idea of radio signals as the theme of ‘sound’. There’s a certain nostalgia and simplicity in the crackling radio noise that simply sends us back to a time when radio was one of the main tools of communication.
Another interesting to note about the design of the three different boxes: the length of the soundtrack is equivalent to the length of the box itself! How cool is that!

Writing Sound: John Cage


Alas, one of the main attractions of the exhibition: the piano. Sitting right in the middle of the room is a piano, stationary and almost volatile. Yet, we were stunned when it began to play a rather comprehensive piece, filled with breaths of staccato in between. It certainly feels like the piece is reverberating throughout the entire exhibit. 

The piece comes to be 4’33, by John Cage. It refers to the total length in minutes and seconds of the performance, and the piece has widely inspired a greater audience, even athletes. It’s amazing to know how much music can transcend beyond a single medium, and reproduce in other forms. 

If you wanna know just how impressive the piece was, check out the small snippet here:



Chair of Concentration: Chen Zhen


This exhibit stood out to me because it was made of pieces of furniture that are very familiar in my own life and culture - an antique wooden chair that looks like something my great-grandparents would have owned in their time, and connected to it, a giant pair of ‘headphones’ made of chinese chamber pots.

Now, we all know that chamber pots are used to store human waste, so it was really funny to me that Chinese artist Chen Zhen used them as part of his artwork. Within the chamber pots are speakers that play an empty static noise. Someone sitting in that chair would be quite literally ‘listening to crap’. Maybe Chen Zhen should have put farting noises in those chamber pots instead?

All jokes aside, I think there’s definitely some kind of deeper, less crass interpretation behind this installation. My best guess is that it has something to do with how the act of taking a dump is detoxifying and symbolises the expulsion of bad energy and other unwanted negativity. Sitting in that chair and focusing on the steady static could probably do the same for us mentally, drowning out any negative thoughts and resetting our emotional state, almost like meditation. This artwork definitely lives up to its name, because speaking from personal experience, meditating and going number 2 both do require a large amount of concentration. Heh.

Arnold Schoenberg, op. 11 - II - Cute Kittens: Cory Arcangel


This piece was a welcome surprise for me, because I LOVE cats. Schoenberg’s original piece, though atonal, is known for favouring emotions and expression over structure and tone. Having adorable kittens play it note for note only elevates the experience. The fact that most of these kittens are just stepping, laying, and stumbling on random piano keys out of clumsiness just evokes an indescribable (like Schoenberg’s music, LOL) feeling of joy in me. Have you ever wondered why we want to squish things that are cute? Apparently it’s because our brain doesn’t know how to deal with overwhelmingly positive feelings. Maybe Schoenberg composed this piece because he saw a really cute kitten and didn’t know what to do with his emotions..? I guess we’ll never know!

The Sound of Non-Sounds: Christine Sun Kim


How does a deaf person experience sound? Well, deaf artist Christine Sun Kim can only guess.

In a world that privileges the auditory, Christine makes us re-examine what ‘sound’ actually means. Using only musical notation and dynamics like piano and forte in her work, she accomplishes the feat of distancing ‘sound’ from hearing, and making it something that can be seen and felt instead. 

Even as someone who is not deaf, I could totally relate to what she was trying to convey. As a nervous wreck myself, the last three lines in The Sound of Obsessing where she goes ham is just #relatable.

Interactive Activities: The Stage is Yours and Compose Your Own Graphic Score

Finally, the exhibition ended with some interactive activities for visitors.


In The Stage is Yours, visitors could play on a silent piano in the middle of the room. Everyone can have their Mozart moment, and the best thing is, only you can hear yourself (so no one will have to hear your terrible playing)!

There were also other interactive activities we could do, such as making music from household objects. 




Compose Your Own Graphic Score was pretty cool too. Visitors were allowed to write their own graphic notations and sheet music using different templates that had different shapes and symbols before adding them to the wall. I guess the idea was to show that music isn’t always just a 5-line stave read from left to right -- it can be so much more. 

Gin at work with her own musical score

All in all, Orchestral Manoeuvres was an iNteReStING (as TwoSetViolin would say) experience. If you want to give it a shot, the exhibition will be up until 2 January 2022, so there’s still plenty of time for you to experience music in a whole new light!

Orchestral Manoeuvres: See Sound. Feel Sound. Be Sound is open from now till 2 Jan 2022 at the ArtScience Museum, so do get your tickets and enjoy this immersive sound-art installation! 

Written by kimizomi, Yin and Gin
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Anime Review: Shiroi Suna no Aquatope (First Ep)

Thursday, September 2, 2021 / No Comments

Hi everyone! I hope that all of you are having a lovely September ahead. 


It's been a while since I have actually sat down and watched a proper anime series in a long time, and after scrolling through some anime to watch, I was pleasantly delighted to stumble upon Shiroi Suna no Aquatope (The Aquatope on White Sand). What makes it even better is the fact that its a recently produced animation from P.A Works! If you haven't known, P.A Works is my favourite animation studio, and I even wrote an article on it before here so check it out if you want to get familiarised with this animation studio first!  


Shiroi Suna no Aquatope is still an ongoing series, with only about 9 out of 24 episodes so far that has been released. As such, I will keep this review limited to my viewing of the first episode.

 

Shiroi Suna no Aquatope presents itself as a slice-of-life piece, with two girls as the main leads. This comes as no surprise as an avid P.A Works fan, as they have always been consistent in their slice-of-life genres. It is even more consistent with the fact that this, as mentioned, is a 24-episode series. Hence, we can all be ready for the slow paced, yet relaxing atmosphere this show will bring us. 


In the first few minutes of the episode, we are greeted by a few shots of an idyllic countryside, along with mellow, folk-like sounds in the soundtrack.




Another thing about P.A Works: their attention to the more quiet, yet picturesque setting in the more tucked away corners of the country. It reminds me of Manoyama, the town in Sakura Quest, another of their 24-episodic series they have produced (which I love a lot).

Next, we see a blue-haired girl, Misakino Kukuru, praying by the mini shrine, with a fish head as an offering. She seems desperate for help, and we will know why in time to come. 


We see a bit of Kukuru's life, though not a lot is revealed just yet. 

Kukuru lives with her grandparents, making us wonder... Where are her parents?

This gives a small clue, but its not enough to know her backstory yet.

Okay but one thing we know about her is she rides a scooter to school, as opposed to the usual bicycles we see in other anime. How cool is that?!

The slow, folk-like soundtrack starts to fade out, as incessant horns from traffic punctuates the atmosphere. We then find ourselves in Tokyo now, as we are introduced to the other half of the likely duo, Miyazawa Fuuka. 

After giving up her idol dreams for reasons yet unknown, Fuuka has to move back home to Morioka. It is interesting to note that Fuuka is voiced by Rikako Aida, the voice actress of Riko from Love Live! Sunshine. Hence, it is probably one of the most fitting castings because in Love Live! Sunshine, Riko had to move from the city to a more rural part of the country as well. Another thing about Fuuka: she reminds me of Hitomi from Iroduku: The World in Colours, which is also one of P.A Works creation.


Hitomi from Iroduku

Clearly, Fuuka doesn't want to head home yet. As she glances upon a poster of Okinawa, she decides to maybe take a detour. 



Thereafter, she stumbles upon a fortune teller who gives her advice on what to do next. 


And so, that's what she did. 


Unfortunately, the heat becomes too unbearable for Fuuka, and she collapses. Thankfully, she meets the help of a local, who is actually from a tourism association.



She then introduces Fuuka to a few places, and one of it captures her attention. 

The Gama Gama Aquarium

Fuuka doesn't hesitate to make her journey there. Turning off her cellphone to reduce contact with anyone she knows, she decides to take an extended trip instead of heading home.


The Gama Gama Aquarium gives me the same vibes as the Kingdom of Chupakabura. Although they look old and tucked away, it seems like there is still beauty within its compound, and all it needs is for someone to "save" it to ensure a better future for the building.

Kingdom of Chupakabura in Sakura Quest

And of course, what's inside the aquarium is breathtaking. It almost feels like we are in the same waters as the fishes. 


It's nice to see that Fuuka also takes note of fishes that may be hidden, feeling a sense of similarity with it. This might be a clue on what has happened to her idol career. Maybe she wasn't seen enough to fulfil her dreams, and that's sadly common in the idol industry.


Suddenly, Fuuka starts to enter a dream-like sequence. She gets engulfed into the same environment as the fishes, almost as if she is breathing through it.



It's a beautiful scene, and I can't help but once again strike a similarity with another of P.A Works work, Nagi no Asakura, where the characters literally live under the sea. It is a visual delight. 

Kakichan the boy oyster playing hide-and-seek with Hammerhead


A still from Nagi no Asakura

And then Fuuka is brought back to reality. There, she is then approached by a friendly Kukuru, who explains that the phenomenon can only happen to some people who see it. Although maybe, it might have just been a rumour by her grandfather. 

She then introduces herself as the Director of the aquarium, which is an interesting feat for a young high-schooler. This then sets up more things between the two girls, and we are left with the excitement of seeing where this will go in the next few episodes. 

Overall, the first episode of Shiroi Suna no Aquatope has been wonderfully paced. With backstories that are still withheld from us, we are geared into knowing more about the aquarium in the next few episodes. The soundtrack is calm and beautiful, much like its visuals. Coming back to a P.A Works series is always amazing, and I am not left disappointed. Although the series isn't complete yet, I am willing to wait for more episodes to release so that I can binge it all at one go. If you like warm slice-of-life series like this with interesting main leads, you should try this out!


Written by: kimizomi 

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